Seven World Records Fall at 2013 USA Masters Outdoor Championships

July 15, 2013 at 2:45pm EST | by NYRR staff

As seasoned athletes rose up, world and U.S. records came tumbling down at the 2013 USA Masters Outdoor Track & Field Championships, held July 11 through 14 in Olathe, Kansas.

By the end of the four-day meet—which featured more than a thousand athletes aged 30 to 95—20 listed age-group records had been broken. Seven of those were world records, and two were shattered by a single man, Bill Platts.

On Thursday, the 85-year-old from Boise, ID, set a world record in the men’s 85–89 pentathlon, posting a score of 4,624 and bettering the previous mark by more than 1,600 points, OlatheEdge.com reports.

Platts later set a new world standard for javelin throwers aged 85 to 89, winning with a mighty 36.99m/121’-4” toss that bested the previous mark by more than five meters.

Among the other athletes to set world records in Olathe were Grace Padilla, Lisa Ryan, Jennifer Burke, and Sonja Friend-Uhl, who finished the women’s 40-49 4x800m relay in 9:18.33, and Gary Sims, Charles Rose, Mack Stewart, and Robert Lida, who posted a time of 4:54.64 in the men’s 70–79 4x400m relay.

In the men’s 90–94 pole vault, 91-year-old William Bell cleared 2.05m/6’-8.75”, breaking Ralph Maxwell’s 2011 world record by more than two feet. Dallas runner Orville Rogers, meanwhile, proved nonagenarians can still get it done on the track, as the 95-year-old ran the 400 meters in 2:38.64—which was 16 seconds faster than the previous global benchmark.

In the team competition, top bragging rights went to the SoCal Track Club, who picked up 879 points en route to a first-place finish. Second place went to the Atlanta Track Club (335), and the Potomac Valley Track Club took third (227½).

Click here for a full list of winners, and stay tuned for the 2013 World Masters Athletics Championships, set for October 16–27 in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

 

Categories: Human Interest
 
QUOTED

“Our races are to our sport what Wimbledon and the Australian, U.S., and French Opens are to tennis, and what the Masters, U.S., and British Opens and PGA Championship are to golf. Each race has the history, the tradition, the honor roll of legendary champions, and a special place in the eyes of all to make them stand apart from the other events.” Mary Wittenberg